there couldn’t be more difference

between my current shows on the east and west coasts…   in my emil lukas show in san francisco, i’ve given 5 large and 4 small artworks 3,500 square feet of space.    there are as many walls without art hanging on them as there are with.  that wouldn’t work with every exhibition or with all art, but man, this show sings…

curating is creating an opportunity for a viewer to gain insight.   juxtaposing objects to point out relationships makes each object more meaningful — an example of the truism about the whole being greater than the sum of its parts.   a good curator guides a viewer to ways of looking, raises questions,  makes a viewer think.   curating is an intellectual and philosophical endeavor.

exhibition design is an art.

one of the things that sets our exhibitions apart is my insistence on visual breaks within a show.   it’s something you rarely see in commercial galleries and almost never in a museum.   and artists, given the opportunity, will always err on the side of over-hanging…

even though you want to make your viewer aware of relationships between pieces, each piece also needs enough space to be viewed on its own (work that relies on context for its success, isn’t successful).

the beauty of both of my galleries is the way they’re composed of interlocking spaces.   each space is discreet, but views between the spaces allow me to reveal works in an exhibition little by little, drawing a viewer from one space to the next, controlling what can be seen at the same time and the order that it’s viewed.    functional architectural elements such as columns or breaks in the walls create natural separations that prevent monotony.   sure, i have a couple of walls that are long, running expanses.   but only a couple.   and sure, sometimes it’s best to evenly space artworks and hang them on every wall, but only when you do it with intent…

like in the case of these hundreds of ink on paper drawings by lordy rodriguez in my new york space, april 2011.

Advertisements